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Challenges of Requirements Elicitation
Sean Isserman
IS 6840

Appan and Browne's Hypotheses

1. R+ items - requirements targeted by the directed questions. These requirements were drawn at random from the coding scheme (discussed below).
2. R- items - requirements related to the R+ items but not targeted by the directed questions.
3. Nrp items - requirements unrelated to the R+ and R- items.

H1: Recall for R+, R-, and Nrp items will be significantly different for subjects in the Immediate Recall treatment condition.

Hypothesis 2 examines the validity of this theory when there is a 24-hour gap between retrieval practice and final recall.

H2: Recall for R+, R-, and Nrp items will be significantly different for subjects in the Delayed Recall treatment condition.
Hypothesis 3 reflects the RIF theory positing that people who are initially directed toward certain information (R+ items) through multiple retrieval practices (which is hypothesized to result in suppression of other related items) will recall less related information (R- items) than people who are not initially directed toward any information. No differences are hypothesized for Nrp items (that is, items unrelated to R+ items) since these items are not suppressed during retrieval practices. H3: Recall for R- items will be significantly different for subjects in the Control condition and the Immediate Recall treatment condition. (Subjects in the Control condition will recall more R- items than subjects in the Immediate Recall treatment condition.)

Hypothesis 4 investigates the validity of the RIF theory proposed for Hypothesis 3 when there is a 24- hour gap between initial retrieval practice and final recall. Specifically, it examines the theory regarding the transient nature of the RIF phenomenon, that is, whether RIF can affect recall of items over a period of time. If RIF is long lasting (and not transient), then the pattern of results should be similar to that found in H3.

H4: Recall for R- items will be significantly different for subjects in the Control condition and the Delayed Recall treatment condition. (Subjects in the Control condition will recall more R- items than subjects in the Delayed Recall treatment condition.)

Hypothesis 5 reflects the notion that people who are not initially directed toward particular information items will recall significantly more information beyond what they originally recalled than people who were initially directed toward certain information items. If this hypothesis is supported, it will provide exceptionally strong support for the consequences of the RIF phenomenon in IRD.
H5: Subjects in the Control condition will recall more new items during a second recall opportunity than subjects in the Immediate Recall and Delayed Recall treatment conditions will recall during their free recall opportunity.

Hypothesis 6 proposes that in the absence of any suppression mechanism, RIF does not occur, and people's recall of some information triggers the recall of other related information.


(Appan and Browne, 2010, p. 256-258)
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Figure 1

(Davis, Fuller, and Tremblay, 2006, p.261)
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Figure 2

(Sedbrook, 2005, p.65)
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Figure 3

(Sedbrook, 2005, p.67)
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Figure 4

(Sedbrook, 2005, p.68)
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Figure 5

(Sedbrook, 2005, p.70)
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Figure 6

261

(Al-Karaghouli, Alshawi and Fitzgerald, 2005, p.261)
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Figure 7

(Al-Karaghouli, Alshawi and Fitzgerald, 2005, p.263)
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Figure 8

(Pitts and Browne, 2007, p. 93)
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