International Studies and Programs

Dr. Edwin H. Fedder Founder, International Studies and Programs

 

fedder.jpgEdwin H. Fedder

Dr. Edwin H. Fedder joined the political science faculty of the University of Missouri-St. Louis in 1967 and founded International Studies and Programs in 1968 to promote internationalization of the campus and the curriculum. He also was a former chairman of the University's Senate, the governing body for the campus.

An authority on alliances, NATO, U.S. foreign policy and national security, he wrote numerous articles on the subjects for professional journals, as well as two books - "NATO: The Dynamics of Alliance in the Postwar World" and "Defense Politics of the Atlantic Alliance."

Dr. Edwin H. Fedder joined the political science faculty of the University of Missouri-St. Louis in 1967 and founded the Center for International Studies (now the Office of International Studies and Programs) in 1968 to promote internationalization of the campus and the curriculum. He also was a former chairman of the University's Senate, the governing body for the campus.

An authority on alliances, NATO, U.S. foreign policy and national security, he wrote numerous articles on the subjects for professional journals, as well as two books - "NATO: The Dynamics of Alliance in the Postwar World" and "Defense Politics of the Atlantic Alliance."

Ed was a co-founder of the International Studies Association and a past president of its Midwest and South chapters. He was a visiting fellow at the London School of Economics and a guest lecturer at more than two dozen foreign universities. He was also a member of the Committee on Atlantic Studies and a former chairman of the North American chapter.

A dedicated teacher, Ed influenced the lives of many of his students. He nurtured students and patiently helped them develop intellectually and academically. No one was more able at blending history, international politics, personal relations, and humor to convey indelible insights about international relations and current political developments in the world. Students finished his classes with greater knowledge, sophistication, maturity, and deeper concern for the human condition.

After retiring in 1991, Ed spent his time writing poetry and enjoying his family. A few weeks before his death in December of 1999, he finished pieces in verse on "Pox Americana", "Fascismus" and "The Vietnam War" and demonstrated once again his cleverness, skepticism, and knowledge of history. Ed's wisdom and wit cannot be replaced. He will be missed greatly and forever.

DR. EDWIN H. FEDDER ANNUAL LECTURE IN FOREIGN AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS - established in 2000

September 6, 2000. Marshall D. Shulman, The Adlai E. Stevenson Professor Emeritus of International Relations; Founding Director of the Harriman Institute; and Special Assistant to the Secretary of State, 1950-1953. “The U.S., Russia and Europe: The Cold War and the Future.”

November 29, 2001. Gale A. Mattox, Professor of Political Science, U.S. Naval Academy. “New Challenges to NATO.”

September 11, 2002. Charles A. Kupchan, Associate Professor, Department of Government and School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University. “The U.S.A. and the Future of Multilateralism in the Post 9/11 Era: Is the U.S.A. a Sheriff Without a Posse?”

September 11, 2003. Lawrence J. Korb, Senior Fellow and Director, National Security Studies, Council on Foreign Relations. “National Security in an Age of Terrorism, Tyrants and Weapons of Mass Destruction.”

September 1, 2004. Stephen M. Walt, Academic Dean and Professor of International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. “America and the World in the Age of Terror.”

September 7, 2005. Lawrence S. Kaplan, Emeritus Director, Lemnitzer Center for NATO Studies, Kent State University; and Professorial Lecturer in History, Georgetown University. “The Future of NATO.”

March 7, 2007. Frederic S. Pearson, Professor of Political Science and Director, Center for Peace and Conflict Studies, Wayne State University; and J. Martin Rochester, Professor of Political Science, University of Missouri-St. Louis. “An Assessment of the Iraq War and the Bush Foreign Policy: Point/Counterpoint.” 

September 11, 2007. Simon Serfaty, The Zbigniew Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and Geostrategy, Center for Strategic and International Studies. “The Transatlantic Partnership At 60: Beyond Bush and Iraq.”

October 27, 2008. Jacques Andréani, Former French Ambassador to the U.S.A. “French Leadership in a United Europe.” 

November 11, 2009. John Mueller, The Woody Hayes Chair of National Security Studies, Mershon Center, and Professor of Political Science, The Ohio State University. “Nuclear Alarmism from Hiroshima to Al Qaeda.”

November 10, 2010. Robert H. Legvold, The Marshall D. Shulman Professor Emeritus, Department of Political Science, Columbia University. “Dealing With Russia Obama Style.”

September 12, 2011. Dan Caldwell, Professor of Political Science, Pepperdine Univesity. “Vortex of Conflict: U.S. Policy Towards Afghanistan, Pakistan and Iraq.”

September 11, 2012. Robert P. Barnidge, Jr. Lecturer, School of Law, University of Reading, U.K. “International Law, The War on Terror, and New Modes of Conflict: What Rules Apply?”

October 28, 2013. Mark Tessler, Samuel J. Eldersveld Collegiate Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan. “Islam and Governance in the Arab World.”