Pierre Laclede Honors College

The National Student Exchange (NSE)

 

The National Student Exchange (NSE) is an association of 170 colleges and universities that have joined together to provide tuition reciprocal exchange opportunities for their students. Since 1968, over 70,000 students have been placed at campuses across the U.S., its territories, as well as Canada.

UMSL is a member of NSE, and has sent many students to locations as diverse as the Universities of Maine and Hawaii, Puerto Rico and Guam. Students have gone to Florida to study marine biology, to the University of Alabama to study criminology and to the University of Montana for Wilderness Studies. Our students have attended a variety of schools in all regions of the country for academic, personal, and social reasons; NSE students from an equally diverse number of campuses have enriched our classes and residence halls and contributed vitally to on-campus life. We welcome an average of 10 new students each year and send a like number to other member schools. Full-time students in good standing with their own instititutions and with a 2.5 GPA may participate in the program. Interested parties should apply by February 25th in any given year. There can be placements at any time, but there is less of a selection after the 2nd week in March. NSE Logo

To view the NSE website, click on the NSE logo above.

For further information and advising, please contact:

Chad Hankinson in the Honors College at (314) 516-7152 or by e-mail at
hankinsonc@umsl.edu.

2007-2008 NSE handbook for incoming NSE Students to UMSL.

Map of US Schools, Map of Canadian Schools.


Student Testimonial:

"I spent two semesters studying at the University of Puerto Rico-Rio Piedras. I studied a variety of subjects and, despite the relaxing and vacation-like atmosphere you encounter everywhere from the beach to the bank, the classes were very challenging and rewarding. The school offered a variety of classes including foreign languages, sciences, and music classes. Although transportation outside of the San Juan area could be a little tricky, there were always students at the dorms who would take the exchange students with them wherever they were headed. My most valuable possessions were my swimsuit and towel, my electric fan, comfortable sandals, and quarters for the bus and laundry room!
Because tuition and dorms are so inexpensive, I could use my extra money for traveling expenses. I recommend this university to anyone, including those who are not fluent in Spanish."
-Lindsay Mitchell