What can I do with this major?

Area

Employer

 

Area:

Fieldwork

Sub-Area:

  • Inventory
  • Harvest Planning
  • Reforestation
  • Firefighting
  • Forest Health
  • Wildlife Management
  • Recreational Design/Planning

Employers:

  • State and federal government agencies:
    • USDA Forest Service
    • Local, state, and national parks
    • Reserves
    • State extension services
    • State divisions of forestry
    • Peace Corps
  • Universities
  • Private tree care/landscaping companies
  • Utility companies
  • Consulting firms
  • Pulp and paper manufacturers
  • Timber companies
  • International:
    • World Bank
    • United Nations Food & Agriculture Organization
  • Non-governmental organizations, e.g. The Nature Conservancy

Area:

Forest Products Industry

Sub-Area:

  • Forest Engineering
  • Production
  • Wood Science/Utilization
  • Research
  • Sales
  • Marketing
  • Management
  • Public Relations

Employers:

  • State and federal government agencies:
    • Corps of Engineers
    • Bureau of Outdoor Recreation
    • National and state parks
    • State extension services
    • Resource agencies
  • Universities
  • Pulp and paper manufacturers
  • Timber companies
  • Research groups
  • Consulting firms

Area:

Education and Communication

Sub-Area:

  • Teaching
  • Research
  • Public Relations
  • Environmental Policy/Law

Employers:

  • Local, state, and federal government agencies:
    • City, state, and national parks
    • State extension services
    • Public schools
  • Nature centers
  • Wildlife refuges
  • Youth camps
  • Environmental education centers
  • Universities
  • Vocational schools
  • Private schools
  • Timber companies
  • Pulp and paper manufacturers

Area:

Management

Sub-Area:

  • Resource Recreation
  • Range/Wildland Management
  • Forest Management

Employers:

  • State and federal government agencies:
    • National and state parks
    • USDA Forest Service
    • Corps of Engineers
    • Bureau of Outdoor Recreation
    • Bureau of Land Management
    • Bureau of Indian Affairs
    • Soil Conservation Service
    • Department of Defense
    • State extension services
    • Fish and Wildlife Service
  • Botanical/zoological gardens
  • Historical sites
  • Land management companies
  • Land appraisers
  • Livestock ranches
  • Private consulting services
  • Conservation agencies
  • Universities

General Information and Strategies

  • For entry-level positions, a bachelor's degree is sufficient. Some federal and private agency work, consulting positions, and especially research positions require a graduate degree.
  • Obtain volunteer, part-time, summer, internship, or co-op experiences in field of interest.
  • Develop strong communication and interpersonal skills.
  • Maintain up-to-date computer skills and knowledge of specialized tools used in fieldwork.
  • Join a student club, a student professional association, or a local/state/national forestry association to network and cultivate related academic interests.
  • Plan informational interviews or job shadowing opportunities to make contacts in government and industry and to learn more about specific fields.
  • Stay current on news in forestry including policy issues, industry trends, and the job market by reading periodicals such as the Journal of Forestry or Forestry Industries.
  • Plan to relocate to national parks, forests, and cities with demand for foresters.
  • Be prepared to work under minimal supervision. Many foresters advance from fieldwork to administrative positions.
  • Teacher certification is required for public education and varies by state.
  • Contact the Society of American Foresters for updates to the national Certified Forester credential and other similar certifications.
  • Additional forester certification can be obtained at the state level and varies by state.