Skip to main content

ACP Courses

Current ACP Courses and Descriptions

The following courses are offered to high school students to earn college credit. The number of credit/semester hours for each course is indicated in parentheses ( ) after the course title.

The indications of [C], [MI], [V], [SS], [H], and [MS] reflect which university general education requirements are satisfied by each Advanced Credit course. Courses that satisfy more than one goal, as designated, may be counted for all of the subject areas listed.

In addition, most degrees have a 13-hour foreign language requirement. High school students may satisfy their university foreign language requirement through Advanced Credit foreign language course offerings.

Beyond general education and foreign language requirements, university students in most academic units must satisfy a "Cultural Diversity" course requirement and all students must satisfy the State of Missouri's "American History and Government" course requirement. Several Advanced Credit courses can be taken to satisfy these requirements.

Advanced Credit courses not fulfilling general education goals or foreign language, cultural diversity, or American history and government course requirements may be used to satisfy graduation electives.

Art | Biology | Business | Chemistry | Communication
English
| Foreign Languages and Literatures | History
Mathematics
 | Philosophy | Physics | Political Science | Psychology
Theatre, Dance, & Media Studies

ART

Art History

Art History 1100: Introduction to Western Art (3) [H] - An introduction to major historical movements in Western art.

Art History 2291: Issues and Ideas in Art History (3) - Prerequisite: Art 1100 or permission of instructor. Intensive studies of a few selected works from various eras and cultures, with special attention to the particular social and cultural factors surrounding their creation. May be repeated for credit with change of topic and permission of advisor.

Studio Art

Studio Art 1030: Ceramics I (3) - An introduction to basic methods and theory of ceramics including work with hand-built construction, wheel techniques, and glazing.

Studio Art 1060: Photography I (3) - An introduction to the techniques and aesthetics of black and white photography, the camera and the darkroom.

Studio Art 1130: Ceramics II (3) - A continuation of Art 1030.

Studio Art 1132: Sculpture I (3) - An introduction to traditional and contemporary materials, aesthetics, and theories of three-dimensional art.

Studio Art 1140: Drawing I (3) - An introduction to drawing through the study of figure, object, and environment.

Studio Art 1142: Figure Drawing I (3) - Basic studies of the human form and anatomy from the model in a variety of drawing media.

Studio Art 1150: Design I (3) - Studio problems in the creative use and integration of the elements of two-dimensional design: line, form, space, texture.

Studio Art 1151: Design II (3) - Prerequisite: ST ART 1150. A continuation of ST ART 1150, two-dimensional design, with introduction to color theory. Some application of mixed media problems.

Studio Art 1170: Printmaking I (3) - An introduction to printmaking techniques, materials, and theories. 

Studio Art 1180: Painting I (3) - An introduction to the use of oil and/or acrylic painting media. Studio problems to develop technical and expressive skills on various surfaces.

Studio Art 1210: Graphic Design I (3) - Introduction to graphic design with an emphasis on fundamentals of space, emotion, shape, form, and concept.  Projects in design, layout and typography will be addressed.

Studio Art 1220: Graphic Design II (3) -  Continuing introduction to graphic design, focusing on developing concepts and design process, typographic systems and layout systems. 

Studio Art 2160: Photography II (3) - Continuation of Photography I at the intermediate level.

Go to Top of Page

BIOLOGY

Biology 1012: General Biology (3) [MS] - Emphasis on fundamental principles of biology. Biology 1012 can be applied toward fulfillment of the general education requirement in science. Biology 1012 does not satisfy the prerequisite requirements in other courses in biology at the 2000 level or above. Students who plan to pursue a career in medicine or one of the medical-oriented professions should enroll in Biology 1811 rather than Biology 1012.

Biology 1013: General Biology Laboratory (2) [MS] - Prerequisite: Biology 1012 (may be taken concurrently). Laboratory course to accompany Biology 1012. Biology 1013 can be used to fulfill the general education requirements in a laboratory science. Biology 1012 does not meet the prerequisite requirements for other courses in biology.

Biology 1131: Human Physiology and Anatomy I (4) [MS] - Prerequisite: Biology 1012 or equivalent or consent of instructor. This course covers the basic aspects of the structure of the healthy human body and how it functions. Special emphasis is on how the human body adapts itself to its environment and how changes affect physiological activities.

Biology 1202: Environmental Biology (3) [MI, MS] - An examination of the biological basis of current environmental problems, with emphasis upon resources, energy, pollution, and conservation.

Go to Top of Page

BUSINESS

Business Administration 1900: Introduction to Personal Law (3) - This course introduces students to the American legal system and the basic issues every individual must deal with in our society. The course will be of interest to anyone seeking a job, leasing an apartment, buying a car or house, borrowing money, buying insurance, getting married or divorced, entering contracts, filing a lawsuit, writing a will, or accumulating wealth.

Finance 1590: Personal Finance for Nonbusiness Majors (3) - For future professionals who want to learn more about personal finance and how to better manage their resources.  The topics include purchasing/leasing cars, home acquisitions, investing in stocks and bonds, mutual funds, retirement planning and health and life insurance.  Special emphasis will be on the nontechnical aspects of these issues.  Cannot be used for credit in BSBA program.

Information Systems 1800: Computers & Information Systems (3) [MI] - This course covers the basic concepts of networked computers including the basics of file management on local and remote computers, electronic mail, Internet browsers, and web page development. Students are also exposed to applications used in business for solving problems, communicating, and making informed decisions, including word processors, presentation software, and electronic spreadsheets. Students will also develop business applications using a popular programming language or database management tool. Credit cannot be granted for both Computer Science 1010 and Information Systems 1800.

Go to Top of Page

CHEMISTRY

Chemistry 1111: Introductory Chemistry I (5) [MS] - Presents an introduction to the fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Laboratory experiments are designed to demonstrate some aspects of qualitative and quantitative analysis and to develop skills in laboratory procedures. Chemistry majors may not include both Chem 1082 and 1111, nor both Chem 1011 and 1111 in the 120 hours required for graduation.

Go to Top of Page

COMMUNICATION

Communication 1040: Introduction to Public Speaking (3) [C] - Theories and techniques of organization, evidence, argumentation, persuasion, and delivery in public speaking.

Go to Top of Page

ENGLISH

English 1030: Beginning Creative Writing (3)  [C] - This course introduces students to the building blocks of creative writing adn teh writing workshop classroom.  Students wille explore hwohow creative writers decide what material is best suited for a story, an essay, or a poem. Pairing creativity with critical thinking, the course offers basic writing practice and familiarizes students with primary concepts and techniques of craft (e.g. narrative, point-of-view, voice and style, character development, setting, imagery, and figurative language).

English 1100: First Year Writing (3)  [C] - Teaches critical reading and thinking skills and emphasizes writing as a process. Enhances writing skills through a sequence of increasingly complex writing assignments. Class discussion and small group workshops focus on problems of invention, organization, development, and revision in essay writing. 

English 1120: Introduction to Literature (3) [C,V,H] - The student is introduced to the various literary types, including poetry, drama, fiction, and the essay.

English 1950: Topics in Literature (3) [C,H] - This course will introduce the students to selected literary topics and/or genres. Each semester the department will announce topics and course content. Topics such as alienation, justice, and the absurd, and genres such as science fiction and contemporary drama are typically possibilities.

English 2120: Topics in Writing (3) Prerequisites: English 1100 or consent of the instructor. This course will introduce the student to writing in specific areas. The department will announce topics and course content in the schedule.

English 2350: Our Stories, Oursleves: Introduction to Fiction (3) - A close study of major prose fiction, with particular attention to the varieties of fictional forms and techniques.

English 2360: Hey, Have You Read?  (3) - Prerequisites:  English 1100 or consent of the instructor. This course satisfies the core curriculum requirement for the literature in English area. It introduces students to approaches to reading literature in the 21st century. The course can focus on a specialty area, such as a genre, time period, or nationality, or on a theme transcending several specialty areas. Students will learn to read closely and begin to look at literature through various theoretical or cultural lenses.

English 2370: Drama: The Greatest Hits (3) Prerequisites: English 1100 or consent of the instructor. This course satisfies the core curriculum requirement for the literature in English area. It studies some of history’s most famous dramas both as literary forms and as cultural expressions. Plays will therefore be considered for themselves—for their genre, structure, and language—as well as for their social function, in an effort to better understand the complex communal values, settings, and crises which produced them. Students will read and discuss a wide variety of well-known plays from ancient Greece and Rome, the early modern English stage, and modern and contemporary culture.

Gender Studies

Gender Studies 2102: Introduction to Gender Studies (3) - Same as SOC WK 2102, HIST 2102, and SOC 2102. This core course is required for all Women's and Gender Studies Certificate earners. This class introduces students to the cultural, political, and historical issues that shape gender. Through a variety of disciplinary perspectives in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences, the course familiarizes students with diverse female and male experiences and gendered power relationships.

Go to Top of Page

FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

Chinese

Chinese 1001: Chinese I (5) - Emphasis is placed upon the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Mandarin Chinese and upon the acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax.

Chinese 1002: Chinese II (5) - Prerequisites: Chinese I or equivalent. Emphasis is placed upon the understanding, speaking, reading, and writing of Mandarin Chinese. Continuation of the acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax.

Chinese 2101: Intermediate Chinese I (5) - Prerequisites: Chinese 1002 or equivalent. Grammar review and continued development of language skills.

French

French 1001: French Language and Culture I (5) - Emphasis will be placed upon the speaking and understanding of French and upon the acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax.

French 1002: French Language and Culture II (5) - Prerequisite: French 1001 or equivalent. Emphasis will be placed upon the speaking and understanding of French and upon the acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax.

French 2101: Intermediate French Language and Culture I (3) - Prerequisite: French 1002 or equivalent. Students will advance their understanding of Francophone cultures through discussions, readings, and written work. Language skills will be further developed through meaningful communicative interaction.

German

German 1001: Beginning Language and Culture: German I (5) - Emphasis will be placed upon the speaking and understanding of German and upon the acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax.

German 1002: Beginning Language and Culture: German II (5) - Prerequisite: German 1001 or equivalent. Emphasis will be placed upon the speaking and understanding of German and upon the acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax.

German 2101: Intermediate Language and Culture: German III (3) - Prerequisite: German 1002 or equivalent. Students will advance their understanding of German-speaking cultures through discussions, readings, and written work. Language skills will be further developed through meaningful communicative interaction. 

Spanish

Spanish 1001: Spanish Language and Culture I (5) - Emphasis will be placed upon the speaking and understanding of Spanish and upon the acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax.

Spanish 1002: Spanish Language and Culture II (5) - Prerequisite: Spanish 1001 or equivalent. Emphasis will be placed upon the speaking and understanding of Spanish and upon the acquisition of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax.

Spanish 2101: Spanish Language and Culture III (3) - Prerequisite: Spanish 1002 or equivalent. Students will advance their understanding of Hispanic cultures through discussions, readings, and written work. Language skills will be further developed through meaningful communicative interaction.

Go to Top of Page

 

HISTORY

History 1001: American Civilization to 1865 (3) [SS,C] - Evolution of the cultural tradition of the Americas from the earliest times to the mid-nineteenth century, with emphasis on the relationship of ideas and institutions to the historical background. Course fulfills the state requirement for American history and government. History 1001 or History 1002 may be taken separately.

History 1002: American Civilization 1865 to present (3) [C,SS] - Continuation of History 1001 to the present. Course fulfills the state requirement for American history and government. History 1001 or History 1002 may be taken separately.

History 1003: African-American History (3) [V,SS] - A survey of African-American history from the beginning of the European slave trade to the modern Civil Rights era.

History 1030: The Ancient Empires of the Mediterranean (3) - Survey of ancient history in the near east, the Aegean, the central and western Mediterranean.  Themes: politics and economy, war and society, culture, including art, literature, technology, religion and philosophy.  The chronological span is from the neolithic period (7500-3000 B.C.) in the
near east to the fall of the Roman Empire in the fifth century A.D.

History 1031: Topics in European Civilization: Emergence of Western Europe to 1715 (3) [C,SS] - Lectures and discussions on the development of Western European society and tradition from approximately 800 to 1715. Either History 1031 or History 1032 may be taken separately.

History 1032: Topics in European Civilization: 1715 To The Present (3) [C,SS] - Lectures and discussions on the development of Western European society and tradition from 1715 to the present. Either History 1031 or History 1032 may be taken separately.

History 1043: Topics in East Asian History and Culture (3) - This course introduces students to historical and cultural issues in different areas of East Asia, especially, Japan, Korea, and China. Topics may include a survey of history, as well as more specialized areas of politics, culture, literature, art, gender or more contemporarary issues. The regional emphasis is determinded by the instrucor.

History 1075: World History to 1500 (3) - A survey of the history of humankind to 1500 including the beginnings of civilization Mesopotamia, Africa, Asia and the Americas, the rise of Classical civilizations and the development of major transnational social, economic, political and religious networks.

History 1076: World History Since 1500 (3) - A survey of the history of humankind since 1500, emphasizing the growing interdependency of regional economic, political, and social systems.

Go to Top of Page

MATHEMATICS

MATH 1030: College Algebra (3) [MS] - Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the university's mathematics placement examination, obtained in the six months prior to enrollment in this course, a score of 22 or higher on the ACT Math sub-test, or a grade of C or better in a two or four year college intermediate algebra course. Topics in algebra and probability, polynomial functions, the binomial theorem, logarithms, exponentials, and solutions to systems of equations.

MATH 1320 Introduction to Probability and Statistics (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 1030, or MATH 1040 or MATH 1045 or consent of the department. The course will cover basic concepts and emthods in  probability and statistics. Topics include descriptive statistics, probabilities of events, random vatiables and their distributions, sampling distributions, estimation of population parameters, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing for population means and population proportions, chi-square tests.  A student may not receive credit for more than one of MATH 1310, MATH 1320, and MATH 1105. 

MATH 1045 - PreCalculus (5)
Prerequisites: A satisfactory score on the UMSL ALEKS Math Placement Examination, obtained at most one year prior to enrollment in this courses, or consent of the department. This course covers topics including factoring, simplifying rational functions, functions and their graphs, solving linear and nonlinear equations, polynomial functions, inverse functions, the binomial theorem, logarithms, exponentials, solutions to systems of equations using matrices, solutions to nonlinear systems of equations, and sequences. Students will also study trigonometric and inverse trigonometric functions with emphasis on trigonometric identities and equations.

MATH 1800: Analytic Geometry and Calculus I (5) [MS] - This course provides an introduction to differential and integral calculus. Topics include limits, derivatives, related rates, Newton's method, the Mean-Value Theorem, Max-Min problems, the integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Integral Calculus, areas, volumes, and average values.

MATH 1900: Analytic Geometry and Calculus II (5) - Topics include conic sections, rotation of axes, polar coordinates, exponential and logarithmic functions, inverse (trigonometric) functions, integration techniques, applications of integral (including mass, moments, arc length, and hydrostatic pressure), parametric equations, infinite series, power and Taylor series.

Go to Top of Page

PHILOSOPHY

Philosophy 1120: Asian Philosophy (3) [CD, V, H] - Critical study of selected philosophical classics of India and China.

Go to Top of Page

PHYSICS

Geology 1001: General Geology (3) Earth materials and processes, including geological aspects of the resource/energy problems.

Physics 1011: Basic Physics I (3) A course specifically designed for students in health and life sciences, covering the topics of classical mechanics, heat and sound.

Go to Top of Page

POLITICAL SCIENCE

Political Science 1100: Introduction to American Politics (3) [V, SS, ST] - Introduction to basic concepts of government and politics with special reference to the United States, but including comparative material from other systems. This course meets state requirement for American history and government.

Political Science 1500: Introduction to Comparative Politics (3) [MI,V, SS, CD] - This course introduces students to western and non-western systems. It examines similarities and differences in the basic political ideologies, structures, economies, social institutions and governmental processes of developed and developing countries. It also provides frameworks for understanding the cultures of the world that are the basis for formal economic and political institutions. In addition, the course examines the role of non-state institutions, including trans-national ones, in shaping national policies. It uses case studies from Africa, Asia, Latin America, as well as Europe, to enhance student understanding of comparative politics. (This course fulfills the cultural diversity requirement.)

Political Science 2820: United States Foreign Policy (3) - Prerequisite: Political Science 1100 or 1500, or consent of instructor. Examination of the factors influencing the formation and the execution of United States foreign policy, with a focus on specific contemporary foreign policy issues.

Go to Top of Page

PSYCHOLOGY

Psychology 1003: General Psychology (3), [SS] - A broad introductory survey of the general principles of human behavior.

Go to Top of Page

 

THEATRE, DANCE, & MEDIA STUDIES

Theatre & Dance 1210: Fundamentals of Acting (3), [H] - Course develops personal communication and presentational skills through vocal, physical, and emotional exercises designed for the beginning actor. Course emphasizes relaxation, concentration, improvisation, script analysis, characterization, and scene work exercises to develop elementary performance skills.

Theatre & Dance 1900: Introduction to Theatre Technology (3) - Introductory course covering the basic theories and techniques of Theatre Technology including stage equipment and safety, scenery, lighting, costuming, properties, sound and box office. Course includes practical application through a minimum of 25 hours of lab work in conjunction with a departmental production. 

Go to Top of Page